Friday, September 19, 2008

McCall's Best Gold Cake, Revised

This is the first part of a 2 cake series; the second one will follow in a couple of days.

I found this recipe in a 1960 or so McCall's cookbook, and the one that will follow several pages later. If there's one thing I love, it's a good yellow cake. And trust me, this one is rich and good. Bear in mind as you read it that I do not, for any reason, cook with shortening. It's just one of those things that simply can't happen in my world, having nothing to do with reason, and everything to do with hearing someone refer to Crisco as "fat in a can" when I was very young, maybe 5. Well, in the deep, dark recesses of my pea-sized brain, I don't want any fat in my can, and so can't cook with the stuff. Thanks for playing shrink, and letting me explore my aversion to Crisco, but please don't send the psychoanalysis bill, because I'll be too busy realigning
my fat management program. Anyway, on to why you're really here.....

RICH GOLD CAKE

2-1/2 cups sifted cake flour
1-1/2 cups sugar
1 tsp salt
3 tsp baking powder
1/2 cup unsalted butter

1-1/4 cup milk
5 egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350F. Grease & flour a 14x9 cake pan, or two 9" layer pans. In a large bowl, sift the dry ingredients together. Add the butter and 3/4 cup milk; beat 2 minutes at medium speed. Add egg yolks, remaining milk and vanilla; beat 2 minutes longer. Pour the batter into prepared pan(s), and bake 30 to 35 minutes for layers, or 35 to 40 minutes for oblong, my cake of choice for this recipe. Cool the cake in the pan(s) before removing. Coo
l thoroughly before frosting.

Where I used butter, the original recipe called for shortening. This was a very flavorful cake, although my youngest was griping that he prefers my mint chocolate buttercream frosting over my vanilla buttercream frosting. Well, I guess I can't please everyone, although I try.

This was the last corner of the cake. While I made it a couple of days ago, I couldn't get a decent picture of it, because no one would let theirs sit so I could take its picture. And I certainly wasn't going to cut myself a piece, preferring to instead eat only 2 bites of the corner of my dearly beloved's piece. He doesn't gain weight, but I do, so I limit my food "sins" to sharing his!

12 comments:

Peter M said...

I can see the moistness of the cake...I'm all in!

Pam said...

Yum. I'll take one piece with a glass of milk please. Looks great Marjie.

Paula said...

Ah Marjie, you always make me smile. Everyday I like to visit here because I know you'll have something great posted. I laughed about your fat in the can. I'll never think of Crisco the same again! I know many folks who use it to fry foods, and I just can't get myself to try it. I do, though, use it to grease pans. Of course from now on I'll be thinking "fact in a can"! :-) That cake looks really good, and the close up photo is great! You'll shake your head at me when I tell you that I've only made yellow cake from a mix. I know yours is wayyyy better. Here's a question for you, and it proves how rarely I make cake. Your buttercream frosting looks so rich and creamy ... do you have to refrigerate it? One more thing ... whose idea was it that the menfolk in our lives can eat anything without gaining an ounce?

Paula said...

Oh man, meant to say "fat in can" not fact. Better get my fat facts straight!

Annette said...

I Agree with you...butter rules!!

The Blonde Duck said...

What a shame to have to cook but not indulge! It looks great!

Violin Mom said...

Did you say mint chocolate buttercream frosting? Oh, I couldn't do without that, either. Looks yum!

noble pig said...

I swear the best cake are just the non-fancy ones in a 9 x 13 pan! Love this, thank you for posting it.

Prudy said...

Fat in a can, yikes, that sounds awful. I do use it for pie crust though. The cake looks wonderful. Such self control!

Grace said...

an oldie but goodie--that's what i like to see. and personally, i'm a huge fan of fat in a can--in moderation, of course. :)

Lucy said...

This look very moist and sounds absolutely delicious. And... I would go w/the butter too ;-)

Katherine Aucoin said...

Something about those older recipes. I have a couple of old cookbooks and they call for "lard". Can you imagine? Your cake is beautiful!