Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Cottage Pudding

Given that my boys brought me this basket of apples, I will soon be returning to my regularly scheduled apple dessert programming. Given this recent post about apple seeds, I won't be eating any seeds any time soon, but then, I never have.
Now, on to the good stuff. This is another dessert I found in the Fanny Farmer cookbook. I really don't know why it's called "pudding"; it's another of life's great mysteries!

COTTAGE PUDDING

1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup melted butter
1-1/2 cups flour
2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar

Beat together the egg, milk and butter. Sift together the remaining ingredients and add to the liquid mix. Pour into a greased 8x8 or 7x10 baking pan and bake at 400F for 20 to 25 minutes, until the top is crusty and brown. Serve topped with vanilla sauce, lemon sauce or sliced, sugared strawberries.

VANILLA SAUCE

1/2 cup sugar
1 tbsp cornstarch
1 cup boiling water

1 tsp vanilla extract
few grains salt
2 tbsp unsalted butter


Whisk the sugar & cornstarch together in a saucepan, and add the boiling water. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the vanilla, salt and butter. Serve hot over the cottage pudding. It would also work well over ice cream.

This isn't at all what I expected from "pudding", so I presume I don't understand the English definition of pudding. To me, pudding is custard. No matter, because this was good anyway!

15 comments:

gaylen said...

I'm surprised you didn't go for the lemon topping. That does look good. I'm cutting out all things bad for me right after my birthday. UGH! g

Greg C said...

I gained 10 lbs just looking at the pictures. I am losing at the diet race.

The Blonde Duck said...

I think it's an English thing. Yorkshire pudding is bread and they call it pudding. Ask Marie. She'd know.

~*Liz*~ said...

Mmmmmmm. Those look good.

~Liz
www.AGiveawayADay.blogspot.com

Pam said...

It doesn't look like pudding but I don't mind - I'll take a slice please. It looks really, really good Marjie.

Paula said...

My English neighbor growing up referred to desserts as "pudding". I don't care what you call this as long as I can have some! I like unfrosted cakes, and prefer them as you've shown here or with a dollop (big dollop!) of whipped cream! YUMMMMM!

Pam said...

I don't know about the pudding either, but whatever you call it, it looks yummy.

Kevin said...

That pudding looks good, especially with the sauces.

Grace said...

this certainly isn't what i expected upon reading "pudding," and frankly, it's even better! i'm more of a cake person, especially cake topped with strawberries. :)

tshirtladyart said...

my mom used to make this when i was a kid. We would take it while it was still warm and crumble it up into a bowl, pour milk and sugar on it like you do cereal, add blueberries or dewberries, and eat it as a dessert, or sometimes even breakfast! It was one of my faves. Mom lost the recipe and I've been searching for it to make for my own kids. I'm gonna try this one and see if it's like I remember.

dotty said...

In England, all dessert is called pudding, no matter what it consists of; cake, pie, trifle, etc.

Anonymous said...

My mom told me she made Cottage Pudding today. I used to love eating it as a kid whenever she made it (I'm 48 now). She made it with/for her granddaughters (3 & 5) ...my nieces. I used to love the warm vanilla sauce. Yummmm!!! KG

Anne Miller said...

Betty Crocker’s Cottage Pudding
(1961)
1 3/4 cups Gold Medal Flour
3/4 cup sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1 egg
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup soft shortening
1 tsp vanilla

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour a square pan (9 X 9). Measure flour by dip-level-pour or by sifting. Stir flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl. Add remaining ingredients; beat until smooth. Pour into pan. Bake 25 to 30 minutes. Serve warm cut in 3”squares with hot Vanilla, Lemon or Nutmeg Sauce. 9 servings.

Vanilla, Lemon or Nutmeg Sauce
1 cup sugar
2 T. cornstarch
2 cups water
1/4 cup butter
2 tsp vanilla or 2 T. lemon juice with 2 T grated lemon rind or 2 tsp nutmeg
Mix sugar and cornstarch in saucepan. Gradually stir in water. Boil 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in butter and flavorings.

From the 1961 Betty Crocker’s New Picture Cook Book, First edition, Fourth printing.
My copy is falling apart. I can’t buy a copy of this version anymore. I’m starting to copy the “favorites” and save them to a file on my computer.

Jackie said...

It is a pudding! I am 74 yrs and cottage pudding was one of the first foods I learned to make in my first Home Ec class in jr. high; that and blanc mange.(on the stove!) It is a soft (supposed to be) cake-like dessert, that when the topping/sauce (originally custard) is originally poured on top, the result is a "pudding" you eat with a spoon (if cooked correctly) The word "cottage" refers to a simple dessert for everyday people, easy to make at a moments notice...good even for baby,,,,as made by simple folks who live in cottages. I feel a bit bad that everyday definitions are being lost and replaced by "fancier ones, not that I don't occasionally prepare a gourmet dinner. Jackie in Seattle

Jackie said...

It is a pudding! I am 74 yrs and cottage pudding was one of the first foods I learned to make in my first Home Ec class in jr. high; that and blanc mange.(on the stove!) It is a soft (supposed to be) cake-like dessert, that when the topping/sauce (originally custard) is originally poured on top, the result is a "pudding" you eat with a spoon (if cooked correctly) The word "cottage" refers to a simple dessert for everyday people, easy to make at a moments notice...good even for baby,,,,as made by simple folks who live in cottages. I feel a bit bad that everyday definitions are being lost and replaced by "fancier ones, not that I don't occasionally prepare a gourmet dinner. Jackie in Seattle