Thursday, December 2, 2010

Thor's Smallest Visitor

While Thor shook hands with lots of people over Thanksgiving week,

And got plenty of ear rubs and hugs,

His smallest visitor wouldn't even talk to him. Winston was petrified of Thor, and of the noise in the house, and hid under my son's bed upstairs for 5 days.

I made him come out to play with me, thus I got this picture of Winston snoozing.


Happy Thorsday, everyone!

19 comments:

Mango said...

Aw, poor Thor. You would have been a good friend to the little kitty. Sigh. It is so sad to be mistaken for a big scary monster.

Slobbers,
Mango

Pam said...

I agree with Mango, Thor would have taken good care of that little kitty cat.

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

I am sure Thor would have been so gentle with the kitten, shame. At one stage in my life I had a great dane, friends who went overseas gave me their pekinese (not my favourite breed!) and my dane was terrified of him!! Diane

Sue said...

Someone should have shown Winston the picture of Thor with the little Guinea Pig.

Nichole said...

Aww...if Winston only knew what a gentle giant Thor is! =)

knittinwolf said...

Winston is such a sweetie...Thor is always adorable!

Janet said...

Poor Winston. He just didn't understand what a gentleman Thor is.

The Blonde Duck said...

Bear would play with him and his lobster!

Ann's Fashion Studio said...

Winston will just have to come back for another visit so he can get use to Thor and then he will see what a gentleman Thor really is :)

Honey the Great Dane said...

Oh Thor - how could Winston be scared of you? You're such a big, gentle softie! (Besides, in my experience, kitties are FAR SCARIER than doggies!!)

Slobbers,
Honey the Great Dane

All Our Fingers in the Pie said...

Poor Winston. Miss Sugar understands completely. She has stayed pretty close to my bed during my reno. Too much noise!

Cheryl said...

Wow, you certainly had a busy week, Thor is adorable and your beautiful family is too! do you ever wear shoes, LOL?

Mickle in NZ said...

Maybe Winston would cope with fewer humans around and if wee Cinnamon there, though I must admit my great big Zebby Cay would have hidden under a bed too.

Winston is a little cutie with very pretty markings and colourings - I'm sure he had fun playing with you.

Fannie Farmer (Mrs.) said...

The kitty looks just like my late cat, a sweet (mostly) and loyal (really) companion for many years.

As far as I can tell with a Google search, you've never mentioned Indian Pudding on your blog, so you may not be familiar with this traditional New England dish. Here's something about it, with a very easy way to make it.

MICROWAVE INDIAN PUDDING
also known as
Population Displacement Pudding

“It's sort of like pumpkin pie, without the pumpkin. And without the pie.” - a description of Indian Pudding to a young relative at a Thanksgiving dinner

A personal note: In honor of our New England ancestors, I served Indian Pudding at our family's Thanksgiving dinner this year. There's a LOT of stirring involved. After the holiday I wondered if someone had developed a microwave adaptation with LESS stirring. Here it is, from Nancy's Kitchen.

About the traditional, but anachronistic, name of the dish: The recipe was adapted from the English “hasty pudding”. What's “Indian” about it is the cornmeal, formerly called “Indian meal”. The original inhabitants of North America had neither dairy products nor molasses, although they had developed maple syrup as an ingenious indigenous equivalent for the latter. The molasses used by the colonists was produced on West Indian plantations by the unpaid labor of involuntary emigrants from Africa, who were found to be more suited to such work than the people in place there when Europeans arrived. Anyone wanting a new name reflecting a contextualized historical and multicultural perspective could call it Population Displacement Pudding.

With best wishes,
Fannie Farmer (Mrs.)

MICROWAVE INDIAN PUDDING

2 c. milk
1/4 c. cornmeal
2 tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ginger
1 egg, beaten
1/4 c. molasses
1 tbsp. melted butter
Vanilla ice cream
Pour 1-1/2 cups milk into 1-1/2 quart bake dish. Cook on 50% (simmer) for 5 minutes. Combine cornmeal, sugar, salt, cinnamon and ginger. Stir into hot milk. Cook, uncovered, on 50% for 4 minutes. Stir well. Beat egg, molasses and butter. Stir a small amount of milk mixture in egg mixture. Return to dish. Stir well. Cook uncovered on 50% for 6 minutes. Pour remaining cold milk over top of pudding. Don't stir. Cook, uncovered, on 50% for 3 minutes until set. Let stand 15 minutes before serving. Serve warm topped with ice cream.

Fannie Farmer (Mrs.) said...

The kitty looks just like my late cat, a sweet (mostly) and loyal (really) companion for many years.

As far as I can tell with a Google search, you've never mentioned Indian Pudding on your blog, so you may not be familiar with this traditional New England dish. Here's something about it, with a very easy way to make it.

MICROWAVE INDIAN PUDDING
also known as
Population Displacement Pudding

“It's sort of like pumpkin pie, without the pumpkin. And without the pie.” - a description of Indian Pudding to a young relative at a Thanksgiving dinner

A personal note: In honor of our New England ancestors, I served Indian Pudding at our family's Thanksgiving dinner this year. There's a LOT of stirring involved. After the holiday I wondered if someone had developed a microwave adaptation with LESS stirring. Here it is, from Nancy's Kitchen.

About the traditional, but anachronistic, name of the dish: The recipe was adapted from the English “hasty pudding”. What's “Indian” about it is the cornmeal, formerly called “Indian meal”. The original inhabitants of North America had neither dairy products nor molasses, although they had developed maple syrup as an ingenious indigenous equivalent for the latter. The molasses used by the colonists was produced on West Indian plantations by the unpaid labor of involuntary emigrants from Africa, who were found to be more suited to such work than the people in place there when Europeans arrived. Anyone wanting a new name reflecting a contextualized historical and multicultural perspective could call it Population Displacement Pudding.

With best wishes,
Fannie Farmer (Mrs.)

MICROWAVE INDIAN PUDDING

2 c. milk
1/4 c. cornmeal
2 tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. ginger
1 egg, beaten
1/4 c. molasses
1 tbsp. melted butter
Vanilla ice cream
Pour 1-1/2 cups milk into 1-1/2 quart bake dish. Cook on 50% (simmer) for 5 minutes. Combine cornmeal, sugar, salt, cinnamon and ginger. Stir into hot milk. Cook, uncovered, on 50% for 4 minutes. Stir well. Beat egg, molasses and butter. Stir a small amount of milk mixture in egg mixture. Return to dish. Stir well. Cook uncovered on 50% for 6 minutes. Pour remaining cold milk over top of pudding. Don't stir. Cook, uncovered, on 50% for 3 minutes until set. Let stand 15 minutes before serving. Serve warm topped with ice cream.

Channon said...

What a gentle giant. I was singing Thor's praises last night, actually... Another friend's hubby really wants a Bermese Mountain Dog, and we are trying to keep him and the Knight away from each other!

Annette said...

Oh, Margie, he looks just like "Stripes"!
Gotta love those tabby cats. I'm sure he'll make friends with Thor.
How does it feel to have only one Calvert student?

Pam said...

What a cutie Winston is...I bet Thor was sad that he didn't get to play with the little guy.

Esme said...

What kind of dog is Thor-he is beautiful.